Photographing Chickens: A Tutorial by Amelia

February 23, 2013  •  11 Comments

 

Amelia has become quite interested in taking photos lately...

So interested, that she wanted to write a little tutorial about photographing chickens to share with everyone.

She asks that you please follow along as she explains the ins-and-outs.

 

Photographing Chickens

by Amelia Fondriest

 

Let's start from the very beginning, a very good place to start. (name that movie)

First, you must befriend the chickens...explain to them what a camera is...and that it means no harm...(meanwhile, get your settings correct on the camera).

 

 

As the chickens begin to show interest and cooperation, start directing them to where the lighting is best for your shots.

 

 

Next, you must act quickly, as chickens are flighty animals and likely to lose their trust in you rather quickly.  Start photographing.

 

 

To ensure that every angle is captured, make sure you turn your camera upside down and inside out.

 

 

It's fun to find all the details of the majestic chicken.  

(see how you can practically look up the rooster's nose in the next picture?  That's what we're going for here folks.)

 

 

Keep the camera up to your eye so that you don't miss a thing.

 

 

If I had put it down, I might not have captured the blinking rooster.  Eye on the ball here ladies and gentlemen.

 

 

Make sure you continually encourage the chickens, letting them know they are doing great, and that you are very appreciative of their cooperation.

 

 

Then, snap a few different angles.

 

 

Let them have a breather every now and then, so that they stay happy with you.

 

 

Take the breather to stop and think about your next move.  (then continue your shoot)

 

 

One common issue worth mentioning:

Some chickens may think that they are better than others and try to step in front of the camera.

My advice:

Just let them have their moment of glory, there's no use fighting it.  Go ahead and take their picture too, you'll end up getting more cooperation out of the flock as a whole, yielding better overall photos.  (see example below)

 

 

Also, remember that it's very important to never let them look down on you.  You are a comrade, not part of the flock.  

 

 

Now, the hard part is deciding when enough is enough.  I always find it difficult to cut myself off from taking pictures, thinking I can get just one more.  But, you just have to stop yourself, and walk away.  It's not always easy.  

 

 

You just have to remember that there are always opportunities to take more photos elsewhere.

 

 

I appreciate you taking the time to read my 'Photographing Chickens' tutorial.  

It's always fun sharing my eggs-periences with you.

 

 

-Amelia


Comments

Michael Florez(non-registered)
Sound of Music, Do Re Mi
marys little lambs(non-registered)
Thanks for eggucating me on chickems! This was very eggciting and it cracked me up! Little Amelia is egg-stra-special and that's no yoke.
Eric(non-registered)
Very informative. I look forward to your next posting
Carol Bitting(non-registered)
Good job Amelia, thank your mom for the spelling.
Mary Ann Piercy(non-registered)
I absolutely love this latest blog! Thanks Amelia for sharing.
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